3 Tips to Add Power to Your Game

For the squat: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing forward and knees slightly bent. Contract the abs and keep them in, engaged as you slowly bend the knees into a squat position.

Remember to keep knees behind the toes. As you return to the starting position, contract the glutes and hamstrings and lead with your hips, not your chest. Start with 12 repetitions for two sets.

More: How Circuit Training Can Improve Your Tennis Game

For the wall sit: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and toes pointing forward. Bend your knees until they're at a 90-degree angle and place your back flat against a wall. Hold that position for 30 seconds. Rest for 30 seconds and repeat three times. Work up to 60-second intervals for five repetitions.

Invest in a Medicine Ball

Continue the mimicking of movements concept, but incorporate a medicine ball or kettlebell into your routine.

Take a medicine ball or kettlebell and face forward. Knees should be bent slightly and your feet shoulder-width apart.

More: 7 Glute Stretches for Maximum Performance

Start with the kettlebell in both hands and bring it to the outside of your hips. Reverse direction and swing it diagonally up to the opposite corner. Stay in control and don't execute the exercise too rapidly. Start with 12 diagonal swings, one each side, for two sets.

Don't Ignore Your Ankles and Feet

One of the most commonly overlooked parts of the body is the ankle and foot, Wright says.

"And that's a problem because in tennis we use our ankle and foot constantly," he says. "Players that have agility, speed, flexibility and few injuries pay attention to their ankles and feet."

More: 7 Exercises for Fitter Feet

Wright suggests simple exercises like hopping on one foot for 30-second intervals.

An alternative is the box jump. Begin by imagining a 12-inch-square box on the floor. With your feet together begin in one corner and moving in a clockwise direction jump to each corner.

After 30 seconds, switch directions. Work up to two sets of 60-second intervals. For a real sweat fest, make that imaginary box bigger.

More: Kickass Pre-Match Warmup

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About the Author

Kirsten Korosec

Kirsten Korosec is the tennis editor for Active.com. When she's not on the court, she can be found hiking, rock climbing and participating in endurance events.
Kirsten Korosec is the tennis editor for Active.com. When she's not on the court, she can be found hiking, rock climbing and participating in endurance events.

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