The Best Ski Gloves of 2023: Keep Your Hands Toasty and Dry

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Few things can ruin a day on the slopes like the misery of cold, wet hands. That's why it's important to make sure you have warm, comfortable ski gloves or mittens to ensure that all you need to worry about is shredding the slopes. Fortunately, the best ski gloves come in a multitude of styles, making it easy for you to get the exact pair that suits you—and matches your ski jacket—the best.

Snow conditions and temperature are two of the main factors you'll want to consider before making a purchase. To help you in your search, we're here to break down everything you need to keep in mind when searching for the best ski gloves like insulation, waterproofing, durability, and style. We also include our top picks so that you can make an informed decision on keeping your paws toasty from the lift to the lodge.

The Best Ski Gloves - Our Top Picks

Why Trust Us?

ACTIVE.com's editorial team relies on the knowledge and experience of fitness and wellness experts including competitive athletes, coaches, physical therapists, nutritionists, and certified trainers. This helps us ensure the products we feature are of the highest standard. Collectively, the team has spent countless hours researching equipment, gear, and recovery tools in order to create the most accurate, authentic content for our readers. Customer satisfaction is also a key part of our review process, which is why we only feature products that are highly rated.

Best Overall - Arc-teryx Sabre Gloves

Best Overall - Arc-teryx Sabre Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Nylon and Leather
  • Insulation: Synthetic fill

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Arc-teryx Sabre Gloves feel like slipping on a comfy puffy jacket. They are soft but tough. Plus, we like that they provide a remarkable amount of warmth without hindering your dexterity. You'll be blown away by how easily you can grip and even use your fingers when they are encased in these gloves.

Additionally, the Arc-teryx Sabres also contain a Gore-Tex membrane that makes them highly waterproof. And, although leather can often be high-maintenance, you'll find that these gloves take less upkeep than similar styles. We think that you'll find their versatility and durability allow them to easily transition from swooshing down the slopes to shoveling up the sidewalk.

What We Like

  • Lightweight
  • Warm
  • Waterproof
  • Unrestrictive

What We Don't Like

  • Expensive
  • No drawstring closing

BUY: Arc-teryx Sabre Gloves


Best Ski Gloves for Men - Hand Out Pro Ski Gloves

Best Ski Gloves for Men - Hand Out Pro Ski Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Leather
  • Insulation: Military-grade thermal microfiber

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Innovative and unique, the Hand Out Pro Ski Gloves, are made from hearty leather which is great for men who regularly hit the slopes or partake in other cold-weather activities. What sets these gloves apart from their counterparts is the clever zipper that quickly frees your fingers when you need to use them. Better yet, the finger portion stays attached to the wrist when the Hand Out Pros are unzipped.

Although the military-grade thermal microfiber insulation makes these gloves warm, they also provide a pocket that's the perfect place for a hand warmer. And, as you may expect, these gloves aren't exactly cheap, but if you need gloves that make it easy to access your fingers, we do think this pair is worth it.

What We Like

  • Convenient zip away feature
  • Pocket for hand warmers or extra cash
  • Warm

What We Don't Like

  • Expensive
  • Sizes are limited

BUY: Hand Out Pro Ski Gloves


Best Heated Ski Gloves - Black Diamond Solano Heated Gloves

Best Heated Ski Gloves - Black Diamond Solano Heated Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Goatskin leather and nylon
  • Insulation: Synthetic

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When it is bone-chilling cold but the mountains are calling, you may have to take the warmth your gloves provide up a notch. That's when you need to break out the battery-powered heated Black Diamond Solanos. The convenient LED button controls allow you to quickly adjust the temperature of your gloves while the waterproof battery compartment ensures that your batteries survive the elements as well.

Even without the battery-generated heat, these gloves are made to stand up to the toughest elements. The Gore-Tex lining keeps your hands dry while the fleece lining and PrimaLoft provide insulation for overall warmth. Additionally, these gloves come with a carrying case and charger with three adapters.

What We Like

  • Easy battery control
  • Warm even when battery is not being used
  • Included carrying case

What We Don't Like

  • Pricey
  • Loose fingers

BUY: Black Diamond Solano Heated Gloves


Best Ski Gloves for Women - Dakine Excursion Gore-Tex Gloves

Best Ski Gloves for Women - Dakine Excursion Gore-Tex Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Goat leather and nylon
  • Insulation: PrimaSoft Synthetic lining

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It's sometimes hard to keep your hands comfortably warm, but when you slip them into the Dakine Excursions we think you'll experience almost three times the amount of insulation found in mid-layer warmth jackets such as the Patagonia Nano Air. You'll also find that on top of surrounding your hands in top-notch warmth, these gloves also keep the moisture at bay.

Although these gloves are super warm, women will like them for their snug fit that is thanks in part to the four-way stretch soft shell. The soft goat-leather palms provide a more natural feel, giving you a better connection to your poles, boots, and bindings.

What We Like

  • 2-year limited warranty
  • Water-repellent treatment on shell
  • Wool-blend lining helps regulate temperature

What We Don't Like

  • Finger holes might run small

BUY: Dakine Excursion Gore-Tex Gloves


Best Budget Ski Gloves - Jeniulet Winter Gloves

Best Budget Ski Gloves - Jeniulet Winter Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Undercuff
  • Shell: Cotton and waterproof nylon
  • Insulation: Fleece

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Between coats, bibs, and a host of other accessories, the cost of skiing can quickly add up—and that's before you even buy your lift ticket. Fortunately, one way to save money is by getting your hands on, or into, the Jeniulet Winter Gloves. These gloves are remarkably inexpensive, while still providing tremendous warmth even when temperatures dip well below freezing. Despite the low cost, the palm of these gloves is made from leather which helps your dexterity and provides ample grip-ability.

The Jeniulet Winter Gloves consist of six layers of wind-resistant materials. Additionally, the waterproof nylon keeps your hands dry during wet conditions. Granted, these gloves don't offer as many features as their more expensive competitors, but we think they're an outstanding choice given their low cost.

What We Like

  • Budget-friendly
  • Touchscreen-compatibility
  • Ample warmth

What We Don't Like

  • Inconsistent sizing
  • May not fit smaller hands snuggly

BUY: Jeniulet Winter Gloves


Best Waterproof Ski Gloves - Showa Best 282 Atlas Temres Insulated Gloves

Best Waterproof Ski Gloves - Showa Best 282 Atlas Temres Insulated Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Double coated polyurethane
  • Insulation: Acrylic lining

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If you want the best waterproof ski gloves, you'll have to be okay with thinking a little outside of the box. Our favorite ones, the Showa Best 282 Atlas Temres Insulated Gloves, look like they are more at home at a fish market than a powdery downhill. These bright blue gloves were originally manufactured for industrial use. However, if you don't mind looking like you just emerged from Smurf Village, we think that you will find that these gloves do a great job of keeping your hands warm and dry.

The Showa 282 Temres Gloves are completely waterproof thanks to their seamless polyurethane exterior. Because these gloves were originally intended for handling food and other industrial uses, they have a great grip thanks to the rough-feeling coating on the fingers and palms. However, they also provide a surprising amount of dexterity. The drawback to these gloves, though, is the unsecured, flared gauntlet opening that allows some air in.

What We Like

  • Inexpensive
  • Durable
  • Very efficient at keeping water out

What We Don't Like

  • Not very stylish
  • Unsecured wrist opening
  • Bright blue color

BUY: Showa Best 282 Atlas Temres Insulated Gloves


Best Touring Ski Gloves - Outdoor Research Extravert Gloves

Best Touring Ski Gloves - Outdoor Research Extravert Gloves

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Nylon and leather
  • Insulation: Wool blend

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With a name like Extravert, I was expecting flashy, bold gloves. However, Outdoor Research kept the colors subdued and let the durability and quality of these gloves speak for themselves. The glove's exterior shell is made from stretchable nylon which provides a comfortable fit and plenty of flexibility.

If you're exploring unmarked or unpatrolled areas, these gloves can serve you well. Although they are not flashy, they are extremely reliable. Built to handle the rugged adventures of the backcountry, we consider these gloves a top choice for rugged outdoorsmen (and women).

What We Like

  • Contoured fingers
  • Carabiner loop
  • Soft fabric on thumb for wiping nose

What We Don't Like

  • Fits small
  • Durability of palm might not be adequate for some

BUY: Outdoor Research Extravert Gloves


Best Mitten for Skiing - Black Diamond Mercury Mitt

Best Mitten for Skiing - Black Diamond Mercury Mitt

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Pertex Shield shell and goat leather
  • Insulation: PrimaLoft Gold insulation

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When you're looking for ultimate warmth on the ski slopes, mittens are where you turn. And, the Black Diamond Mercury Mitts definitely bring the heat. In fact, these are some of the warmest gloves or mittens around. Additionally, they're built to last and the water-resistant materials keep your hands dry.

While these mittens have a lot to offer as far as warmth and durability go, it's important to note that you will not have a lot of dexterity after sliding your hands into their confines. However, despite these quirks, from the lift to the bottom of your run, these mittens work to keep heat from spreading between your fingers.

What We Like

  • Super warm
  • Plenty of room for your fingers to move freely
  • Kevlar stitching

What We Don't Like

  • Lack of dexterity
  • Palms aren't waterproof

BUY: Black Diamond Mercury Mitt


Best Glove for Backcountry Skiing - Dakine Phoenix Gore-Tex

Best Glove for Backcountry Skiing - Dakine Phoenix Gore-Tex

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Gauntlet
  • Shell: Nylon and goat leather
  • Insulation: PrimaLoft Gold

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Exploring the backcountry means that you need gear that can stand up to the demands of the great outdoors and the Dakine Phoenix Gore-Tex gloves do just that. These gloves aren't made to simply withstand daily use, rather they are built to stand daily abuse. These gloves are made with a removable liner that makes them ideal for the warmer weather of the early and late winter seasons. Plus, they keep your hands warm and dry through a battery of tasks.

We also like that the breathable yet waterproof Gore-Tex insert features a special technology that not only keeps water away but also regulates the temperature inside your glove. When wearing these highly versatile gloves, you won't have to worry about your hands staying safe from whatever conditions Mother Nature may send your way.

What We Like

  • Highly durable
  • Removable liner
  • Temperature regulation technology

What We Don't Like

  • Expensive
  • Some complaints of thumbs being too tight

BUY: Dakine Phoenix Gore-Tex


Best 3 Finger Ski Glove - Hestra Freeride CZone 3-Finger

Best 3 Finger Ski Glove - Hestra Freeride CZone 3-Finger

SPECS

  • Cuff style: Under cuff
  • Shell: Cowhide leather
  • Insulation: Foam

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Three-finger ski gloves combine the superior warmth of mittens with the dexterity of traditional gloves. So, when you're looking for the best of the best in this category, you need to stop at the Hestra Freeride CZones. These gloves are fully waterproof and can stand up to the demands of even the most advanced skiers.

Built tough, these gloves owe their durability to their cowhide leather construction and reinforced fingertips which make them very difficult to rip or tear. And, although these gloves are on the more expensive side, they're chock full of features such as neoprene cuffs which help form the size and shape of your wrist.

What We Like

  • Quality construction
  • Dexterity
  • Foam-fitting neoprene cuffs

What We Don't Like

  • Expensive
  • Some complaints of hole in liner

BUY: Hestra Freeride CZone 3-Finger


Ski Gloves vs. Mittens

Before we dive into what to look for in the best ski gloves, it's helpful to first understand the difference between ski gloves and mittens.

Ski gloves have individual openings for each of the four fingers and the thumb. On the contrary, mittens have one wide opening for the four fingers and an additional opening for the thumb.

When you're skiing, choosing gloves or mittens usually comes down to personal preference. Mittens are warmer because the heat from your fingers can be transferred to one another. Gloves aren't quite as warm, but they do offer more dexterity than mittens.

What to Look for in Ski Gloves

Insulation

Gloves are designed to keep your hands warm and protect them from harsh elements. However, the level of warmth can vary greatly depending on the type and amount of insulation your gloves have. Considering that frigid hands can ruin your experience, it's important to ensure that your ski gloves are well-insulated.

Most ski gloves are insulated with synthetic fill and the fill weight indicates the level of warmth. However, when possible, it's always a good idea to try your gloves on. Also, if even the most insulated gloves aren't enough to keep the cold away, you can always check out heated gloves for extra warmth.

Waterproofing

Keeping your hands dry is also an important aspect when it comes to the warmth of your digits. To ensure that your hands stay dry, waterproof gloves have a built-in membrane between the outer shell and your liner to keep the moisture from seeping in. One thing to keep in mind with waterproof gloves is that the lining decreases breathability.

Although this isn't typically an issue for gloves, if you are out on a warmer day, you will want to note this so that you don't end up with hot, sweaty hands. If you will be skiing in a variety of temperatures, you can always check out gloves with a removable shell.

Cuffs

A ski glove's cuff is how the opening is secured to your body. The two primary kinds of cuffs are known as gauntlet and under cuffs. Gauntlet-style cuffs will remind you of the armored gloves that knights wore as they extend out over your forearm. These gloves are usually insulated and secured by a drawcord to seal out cold air. This makes them an excellent choice for cold, wet weather, or deep powder. More traditional-looking ski gloves, or undercuffs, are shorter than their gauntlet counterparts. Undercuffs can be secured under the wrist of your jacket and allow for better wrist mobility.

Durability

When you're cutting through fresh powder, the last thing you want to think about is your gloves (or any equipment) not holding up to the demands that you are putting on them. Therefore, you will want to purchase durable gloves that are well-constructed gloves and made from quality materials. Gloves that stand the test of time best are usually made with a combination of polyester, nylon, and leather. However, please note that although leather is highly durable, it does require maintenance and upkeep.

Sizing

Although gloves that fit may seem like a no-brainer, it is important that they fit your hand (we're trying not to say like a glove but it's really hard) snugly and securely. However, you want to make sure that they aren't too tight as this could restrict your dexterity and mobility, as well as just feel plain uncomfortable. Ski gloves sizes can vary from brand to brand, therefore, when possible, it's best to try them on to ensure that you have ones that are best suited for your hands.

FAQs About Ski Gloves


Is it better to ski with gloves or mittens?

Skiing with gloves or mittens typically boils down to personal preference. Gloves allow you to perform more tasks because of their added dexterity, but mittens generally keep your hands a little warmer.

Are ski gloves worth it?

If you are planning on spending any amount of time hitting the slopes, we highly recommend you invest in a quality pair of ski gloves. Fortunately, there are ski gloves available in almost every price range.

How do you determine ski glove size?

To get an accurate size for your ski gloves, measure the distance between the tip of your middle finger to the area where your hand meets your wrist on your dominant side. You'll also want to measure the circumference of your hand. These measurements are fairly easy to take with a flexible measuring tape. Once you have these measurements, most ski glove manufacturers offer a sizing chart where you can compare your measurements to their recommended sizes.

About the Author

Sosha Lewis

Sosha is a staff writer for ACTIVE.com and a CrossFit enthusiast. Her work’s been featured in The Washington Post, Huffington Post, MUTHA Magazine, Charlotte Magazine, and The Charlotte Observer. Her weekly column, Soshally Awkward, is featured on the nationally-syndicated radio show, Bob & Sheri.

See More from Sosha

Sosha is a staff writer for ACTIVE.com and a CrossFit enthusiast. Her work’s been featured in The Washington Post, Huffington Post, MUTHA Magazine, Charlotte Magazine, and The Charlotte Observer. Her weekly column, Soshally Awkward, is featured on the nationally-syndicated radio show, Bob & Sheri.

See More from Sosha

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